Books

  1. Best Karate Basics: #2 Fundamentals

    Best Karate Basics: #2 Fundamentals

    $16.99
    As well as setting forth the basic rules that must be put into practice when performing kata or applying techniques in kumite, this volume pinpoints the underlying physical and psychological principles of karate: source and concentration of power; stance, form, stability and technique; movement in all directions; basic and comprehensive aspects of training. Learn More
  2. Best Karate Basics: #4 Kumite 2

    Best Karate Basics: #4 Kumite 2

    $16.99
    This book complements volume 3 of this series and, like the earlier volume, includes writings of masters of the martiasl arts to guide the student toward spiritual awareness and mental maturity. It places kumite in perspective, relating it to training as a whole. Learn More
  3. Explosive Karate: Understanding Karate Mechanics

    Explosive Karate: Understanding Karate Mechanics

    $20.00
    Explosive Karate: Understanding Karate Mechanics. You have all heard about Art Rabesa’s Explosive Punch and Kick. Well here is the book that teaches the techniques. Learn More
  4. Chinese Fitness A Mind/Body Approach

    Chinese Fitness A Mind/Body Approach

    $14.00
    The hows and whys of Qigong-- includes two complete sets of exercises. Learn More
  5. Liu Tong Exercise

    Liu Tong Exercise

    $15.00
    ntegrating breathing techniques, Liu Tong Exercise offers relaxation as well as building up physical strength and improving muscle tone. — The set of 36 movements or postures is easy to learn. Patients with physical impairment can do it sitting down. It does not require special outfit or equipment. Once you have learned it, you can do it almost anywhere at any time. The benefits are many. Participants report better balance, better sleep, better mood, less stiffness and less pain. In 1996, Liu Tong Exercise was introduced at Pacific Complementary Medicine Center by Bob Hong. Liu Tong Exercise consists of 36 movements, each specifically designed to stimulate a certain section or regulate a certain function of the body. These postures are surprisingly simple, yet they call for a certain precision of form to bring the desired results health-wise. Each is repeated 10 times in a rhythmic motion. Throughout, consistent repetition is basic to success. Age is irrelevant in the practice of Liu Tong. In a class where the age span was 55-92, all the students were able to go through the exercises, and did so with enthusiasm. It is helpful to have a gentle warm-up period, such as the building of chi (or qi) by rubbing the hands together, limbering the shoulders with swimming motions and deep abdominal breathing. Of course, deep breathing is a factor in the entire program, but, in the warm-up, it is done consciously as an exercise unto itself. Learn More